ISF VII WOMEN'S WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

LOCATION: Normal, Illinois (USA)
DATES: July 13-21, 1990
PARTICIPATING COUNTRIES (20): Argentina, Aruba, Australia, Bahamas, Bermuda, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, Cuba, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Philippines, Puerto Rico, USA, Zimbabwe

UMPIRES

FINAL ROUND ROBIN STANDINGS

Team
W
L
USA
9
0
New Zealand
8
1
China
8
1
Australia
8
1
Chinese Taipei
6
3
Japan
6
3
Canada
6
3
Italy
6
3
Netherlands
5
4
Cuba
5
4
Puerto Rico
5
4
Philippines
4
5
Bahamas
4
5
Netherlands Antilles
4
5
Mexico
2
7
Aruba
2
7
Bermuda
1
8
Indonesia
1
8
Argentina
0
9
Zimbabwe
0
9

 

Semi-Finals
USA 6, New Zealand 1
China 1, Australia 0 (10 innings)
Finals
New Zealand 1, China 0 (9 innings)
Grand Final
Rain washed out grand final with USA awarded gold medal based on its record in the round robin.

GOLD MEDAL: United States
SILVER MEDAL: New Zealand
BRONZE MEDAL: China

Teams or Observers From 26 Countries Attend Women's World

The United States has now captured four of the seven International Softball Federation Women's World Championships with its win July 21 in Normal, IL (USA), but the Women's World appears to have become more international than ever with attendance this year by teams or observers from 26 countries.

The 20 countries represented by teams in Normal made up the second largest field since the championships began in 1965, and delegates from the International Olympic Committee were on hand for the first time to observe this softball spectacular. IOC Program Commission members Pirjo Haggman, of Finland, and Bashir Attarabulsi, of Lybia, watched the final two days of tournament play. In addition, IOC member Fidel Mendoza, of Colombia, attended several of the event's earlier games, and Soviet Baseball/Softball Federation President Ramaz Goglidze stayed the entire championship as a guest of the ISF.

"The Soviet Union will have a team in the next Women's World," Goglidze said following the tournament.

A less welcome guest at the tournament in Normal was the rainy weather. Thunderstorms postponed the opening ceremonies scheduled for July 13, so these ceremonies were held the following day. The games scheduled to follow these ceremonies, however, were postponed because of more rain. But the cruelest rain of all began falling on July 21, just before the final medal games had begun. China and Australia completed the bronze medal game, which China won 1-0. The United States and New Zealand were able to complete only four innings of the gold medal game before rain eventually washed out play.

Following a futile wait for rain to stop, ISF officers decided to void the final day's play because the gold medal game had not been completed. This decision was thought to have been made in accordance with the ISF Code and initially resulted in medals being awarded according to win-loss and runs-scored-against records in round robin play, with the United States (9-0) winning the gold, New Zealand (8-1) the silver, and Australia (8-1) the bronze.

China protested this decision, as it had completed and won its playoff game with Australia. So the ISF met several days after the tournament, and, following a detailed review of ISF rules, awarded the bronze medal to China. ISF President Don Porter apologized for the premature announcement awarding Australia the bronze medal, but said the belated award of the bronze to China was the only fair and correct decision. So, the final standings of the VIIth Women's World ended with the United States winning gold, New Zealand silver and China bronze.

Despite the United States' 9-0 record in round robin play, New Zealand came closer to winning the gold than many realize. New Zealand gave up only one run during round robin play, a heartbreaking 1-0 loss to Chinese Taipei on July 18. If this score were reversed and New Zealand had won 1-0, it might have been New Zealand awarded the gold medal instead of the United States based on runs-scored-against record in round robin play following the final game rain-out.

Regardless of the foul weather and their win-loss records, most of the teams seemed to enjoy their stay in America's heartland. And the town of Normal certainly enjoyed their glimpse of people from all parts of the world. This foreign contingent was on display the afternoon of July 13 with a parade-of-nations through the streets of Normal.

ISF President Porter, who has attended all of the Women's World Championships since they began, was pleased with the tournament despite the weather problems. "It was one of the most competitive in the history of the championships, and the fan support was outstanding, including standing-room-only crowds even during the intermittent rains," Porter said.

(This article appeared in the September 1990 edition of World Softball magazine, Volume 20, Number 3.)

Record-setting performance: Sheila Cornell of the United States set an ISF Women's World Championship record with seven doubles. Chinese Taipei's Yen Show Tzu also recorded eight stolen bases, an ISF WWC record.

 

 

 

 

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